Electronics

/Tag: Electronics

Photocurrent generation with two-dimensional van der Waals semiconductors. (arXiv:1506.00679v1 [cond-mat.mes-hall])

2016-10-15T11:47:20+00:00 June 3rd, 2015|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

By Michele Buscema, Joshua O. Island, Dirk J. Groenendijk, Sofya I. Blanter, Gary A. Steele, Herre S.J. van der Zant, Andres Castellanos-Gomez Two-dimensional (2D) materials have attracted a great deal of interest in
recent years. This family of materials allows for the realization of versatile
electronic devices and holds promise for next-generation (opto)electronics.
Their electronic properties strongly depend on the number of layers, making
them interesting from a fundamental standpoint. For electronic applications,
semiconducting 2D materials benefit …read more

Published in: arXiv Material Science

Defects in atomically thin semiconductor emit single photons

2016-10-15T11:55:42+00:00 May 4th, 2015|Categories: News|Tags: |

Researchers at the University of Rochester have shown that defects on an atomically thin semiconductor can produce light-emitting quantum dots. The quantum dots serve as a source of single photons and could be useful for the integration of quantum photonics with solid-state electronics – a combination known as integrated photonics. …read more

Published in: Phys.org

Wireless Smart Sensor Needs No Battery

2016-10-15T11:58:24+00:00 April 23rd, 2015|Categories: News|Tags: |

By matthew Field-effect TransistorThe Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology has developed a transparent hybrid electronic device production technique for the manufacturing of wireless smart sensors. Details of the research are available on the online edition of Advanced Materials published on April 22.
The transparent hybrid electronic device developed by the research …read more

Published in: Business Korea

Evolution in Semiconductor Industry Continuing

2016-10-15T11:59:43+00:00 April 20th, 2015|Categories: News|Tags: |

By matthew Self-fulfilling ProphecyMoore’s Law, that is, the maxim that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles approximately every two years, commemorated its 50th anniversary on April 19. The co-founder of Intel hit the mark. Intel, Samsung Electronics, and many more have continued to develop the semiconductor industry at …read more

Published in: Business Korea

TiS3 transistors with tailored morphology and electrical properties. (arXiv:1503.06106v1 [cond-mat.mtrl-sci])

2016-10-15T12:07:33+00:00 March 23rd, 2015|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

By Joshua O. Island, Mariam Barawi, Robert Biele, Adrian Almazan, Jose M. Clamagirand, Jose R. Ares, Carlos Sanchez, Herre S.J. van der Zant, Jose V. Alvarez, Roberto D'Agosta, Isabel J. Ferrer, Andres Castellanos-Gomez Control over the morphology of TiS3 is demonstrated by synthesizing 1D
nanoribbons and 2D nanosheets. The nanosheets can be exfoliated down to a
single layer. Through extensive characterization of the two morphologies,
differences in the electronic properties are found and attributed to a higher
density of sulphur vacancies in nanosheets which, according to density
functional …read more

Published in: arXiv Material Science

TiS3 Transistors with Tailored Morphology and Electrical Properties

2016-10-15T12:09:31+00:00 March 13th, 2015|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

By Joshua O. Island, Mariam Barawi, Robert Biele, Adrián Almazán, José M. Clamagirand, José R. Ares, Carlos Sánchez, Herre S. J. van der Zant, José V. Álvarez, Roberto D’Agosta, Isabel J. Ferrer, Andres Castellanos-Gomez Control over the morphology of TiS3 is demonstrated by synthesizing 1D nanoribbons and 2D nanosheets. The nanosheets can be exfoliated down to a single layer. Through extensive characterization of the two morphologies, differences in the electronic properties are found and attributed to a higher density of sulphur vacancies in nanosheets …read more

Published in: Advanced Materials

KAIST Develops 10 nm Flexible Insulating Film

2016-10-15T12:10:21+00:00 March 11th, 2015|Categories: News|Tags: |

By mary Core Tech for IoTThe Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) announced on March 10 that its research team led by biotech professor Lim Sung-kap and electrical and electronics engineering professors Yu Seung-hyup and Jo Byung-jin have developed a very thin, flexible, yet thickness-maintaining polymer insulating film based on …read more

Published in: Business Korea

Electrically Tunable Band Gap in Antiferromagnetic Mott Insulator Sr2IrO4. (arXiv:1502.07982v1 [cond-mat.mes-hall])

2016-10-15T12:13:38+00:00 March 2nd, 2015|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

By Cheng Wang, Heidi Seinige, Gang Cao, Jian-Shi Zhou, John B. Goodenough, Maxim Tsoi

The electronic band gap in conventional semiconductor materials, such as
silicon, is fixed by the material’s crystal structure and chemical composition.
The gap defines the material’s transport and optical properties and is of great
importance for performance of semiconductor devices like diodes, transistors
and lasers. The ability to tune its value would allow enhanced …read more

Published in: arXiv Material Science

Single layer of MX3 (M=Ti, Zr; X=S, Se, Te): a new platform for nano-electronics and optics. (arXiv:1502.05108v1 [cond-mat.mtrl-sci])

2016-10-15T12:15:36+00:00 February 20th, 2015|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

By Yingdi Jin, Xingxing Li, Jinlong Yang

A serial of two dimensional titanium and zirconium trichalcogenides
nanosheets MX3 (M=Ti, Zr; X=S, Se, Te) are investigated based on
first-principles calculations. The evaluated low cleavage energy indicates that
stable two dimensional monolayers can be exfoliated from their bulk crystals in
experiment. Electronic studies reveal very rich electronic properties in these
monolayers, including metallic TiTe3 …read more

Published in: arXiv Material Science

Nanomaterial-Enabled Stretchable Conductors: Strategies, Materials and Devices

2016-10-15T12:23:16+00:00 January 26th, 2015|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

By Shanshan Yao, Yong Zhu

Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

Stretchable electronics are attracting intensive attention due to their promising applications in many areas where electronic devices undergo large deformation and/or form intimate contact with curvilinear surfaces. On the other hand, a plethora of nanomaterials with outstanding properties have emerged over the past decades. The understanding of nanoscale phenomena, materials, …read more

Via: Advanced Materials

Development of high frequency and wide bandwidth Johnson noise thermometry

2016-10-15T12:25:16+00:00 January 16th, 2015|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

By Jesse Crossno, Xiaomeng Liu, Thomas A. Ohki, Philip Kim and Kin Chung Fong

We develop a high frequency, wide bandwidth radiometer operating at room temperature, which augments the traditional technique of Johnson noise thermometry for nanoscale thermal transport studies. Employing low noise
amplifiers and an analog multiplier operating at …read more

Via: Applied Physics Letters

Contact resistance and overlapping capacitance in flexible sub-micron long oxide thin-film transistors for above 100 MHz operation

2016-10-15T12:29:24+00:00 December 31st, 2014|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

By Niko Münzenrieder, Giovanni A. Salvatore, Luisa Petti, Christoph Zysset, Lars Büthe, Christian Vogt, Giuseppe Cantarella and Gerhard Tröster

In recent years new forms of electronic devices such as electronic papers, flexible displays, epidermal sensors, and smart textiles have become reality. Thin-film transistors
(TFTs) are the basic blocks of the circuits used in such devices …read more

Via:: Applied Physics Letters

New findings could point the way to “valleytronics”

2016-10-15T12:33:10+00:00 December 15th, 2014|Categories: News|Tags: |

By David L. Chandler | MIT News Office

New findings from a team at MIT and other institutions could provide a pathway toward a kind of two-dimensional microchip that would make use of a characteristic of electrons other than their electrical charge, as in conventional electronics. The new approach is dubbed “valleytronics,” because it makes use of properties …read more

Via:: MIT press office

Extreme materials and ubiquitous electronics

2016-10-15T12:36:23+00:00 December 2nd, 2014|Categories: News|Tags: |

By Alice McCarthy | MIT Industrial Liaison Program

Nearly everyone seems to carry a cell phone or tablet. But if Tomás Palacios’ vision of the future of electronics comes to bear, it will be increasingly difficult to separate electronics from all the other structures and materials surrounding us. An electrical engineer by training, Palacios, an associate professor of …read more

Via:: MIT press office

New 2-D quantum materials for nanoelectronics

2016-10-15T12:39:12+00:00 November 20th, 2014|Categories: News|Tags: |

By David L. Chandler | MIT News Office

Researchers at MIT say they have carried out a theoretical analysis showing that a family of two-dimensional materials exhibits exotic quantum properties that may enable a new type of nanoscale electronics.

These materials are predicted to show a phenomenon called the quantum spin Hall (QSH) effect, and belong to a class …read more

Via:: MIT press office

Thickness tailed potential barrier at metal/semiconductor interfaces. (arXiv:1410.1943v1 [cond-mat.mes-hall])

2016-10-15T12:49:30+00:00 October 9th, 2014|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

By Song-Lin Li, K. Komatsu, Shu Nakaharai, Yen-Fu Lin, M. Yamamoto, X. F. Duan, K. Tsukagoshi

Understanding the interfacial charge transfer (namely, electrical contact)
between metallic electrodes and low dimensional semiconductors is essential for
realizing next-generation molecular or atomic electronics. The issue is
particularly interesting that how it evolves as the semiconductor is reduced
from three dimensions (3D) to two dimensions (2D). Here, we employ the
cleavable chalcogenide layers as a …read more

Via:: arXiv Material Science

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