Graphene has recently emerged as a promising candidate for a wide range of photonic and optoelectronic applications, with a high application potential in devices using infrared radiation. The optical absorption of 2D materials and graphene can be uniquely enhanced when they are embedded in optical resonant cavities, since optically-thin atomic-thickness absorbers do not perturb the cavity itself. Despite the many theoretical studies, experimental validation is still lagging behind. Here, large near infrared (NIR) absorption of unpatterned chemical vapor deposition graphene is experimentally demonstrated for the first time in a large area (1 inch) passive optical device by exploiting the enhancement of the electric field at the center of a Fabry–Perot cavity. Test devices were fabricated with single layer, double layer and five layers graphene, sandwiched between two almost symmetric Bragg mirrors deposited by radio frequency sputtering and consisting of alternate layers of Si an…

Published in: "Nanotechnology".