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Unique 1D Cd1−[email protected]‐MoS2/NiOx Nanohybrids: Highly Efficient Visible‐Light‐Driven Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution via Integrated Structural Regulation

2019-01-15T16:34:41+00:00January 15th, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: , |

Unique 1D Cd1 − xZn [email protected]‐MoS2/NiO x nanohybrids are prepared which demonstrate a superior visible‐light‐driven photocatalytic H2 evolution activity of 223.17 mmol h−1 g−1, a high apparent quantum yield of 64.1% at 420 nm, and a good stability under long‐time illumination, owing to the optimized band alignments, increased exposure of active sites, and facilitated interfacial charge separation. Abstract Development of noble‐metal‐free photocatalysts for highly efficient sunlight‐driven water splitting is of great interest. Nevertheless, for the photocatalytic H2 evolution reaction (HER), the integrated regulation study on morphology, electronic band structures, and surface active sites of catalyst is still minimal up to now. Herein, well‐defined 1D Cd1− xZn [email protected]‐MoS2/NiO x hybrid nanostructures with enhanced activity and stability for photocatalytic HER are prepared. Interestingly, the band alignments, exposure of active sites, and interfacial charge separation of Cd1− xZn [email protected]‐MoS2/NiO x are optimized by tuning the Zn‐doping content as well as the growth of defect‐rich O‐MoS2 layer and NiO x nanoparticles, which endow the hybrids with excellent HER performances. Specifically, the visible‐light‐driven (>420 nm) HER activity of Cd1− xZn [email protected]‐MoS2/NiO x with 15% Zn‐doping and 0.2 wt% O‐MoS2 (CZ0.15S‐0.2M‐NiO x) in lactic acid solution (66.08 mmol h−1 g−1) is about 25 times that of Pt loaded CZ0.15S, which is further increased to 223.17 mmol h−1 g−1 when using Na2S/Na2SO3 as the sacrificial agent. Meanwhile, in Na2S/Na2SO3 solution, the CZ0.15S‐0.2M‐NiO x sample demonstrates an apparent quantum yield of 64.1% at 420 nm and a good stability for HER under long‐time illumination. The results presented in

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Threshold Voltage Control of Multilayered MoS2 Field‐Effect Transistors via Octadecyltrichlorosilane and their Applications to Active Matrixed Quantum Dot Displays Driven by Enhancement‐Mode Logic Gates

2019-01-14T10:35:16+00:00January 14th, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

Threshold voltage adjustment as a control manner for molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) field‐effect transistors (FETs) is demonstrated by back‐channel modification. Octadecyltrichlorosilane treatment on a back channel of MoS2 FETs induces a negative dipole at the interface, leading to depopulation of electrons. As representative applications, active control for one‐pixel quantum dot light‐emitting diode and full‐swing logic gates are successfully demonstrated. Abstract In recent past, for next‐generation device opportunities such as sub‐10 nm channel field‐effect transistors (FETs), tunneling FETs, and high‐end display backplanes, tremendous research on multilayered molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) among transition metal dichalcogenides has been actively performed. However, nonavailability on a matured threshold voltage control scheme, like a substitutional doping in Si technology, has been plagued for the prosperity of 2D materials in electronics. Herein, an adjustment scheme for threshold voltage of MoS2 FETs by using self‐assembled monolayer treatment via octadecyltrichlorosilane is proposed and demonstrated to show MoS2 FETs in an enhancement mode with preservation of electrical parameters such as field‐effect mobility, subthreshold swing, and current on–off ratio. Furthermore, the mechanisms for threshold voltage adjustment are systematically studied by using atomic force microscopy, Raman, temperature‐dependent electrical characterization, etc. For validation of effects of threshold voltage engineering on MoS2 FETs, full swing inverters, comprising enhancement mode drivers and depletion mode loads are perfectly demonstrated with a maximum gain of 18.2 and a noise margin of ≈45% of 1/2 V DD. More impressively, quantum dot light‐emitting diodes, driven by enhancement mode MoS2 FETs, stably demonstrate 120 cd m−2 at the gate‐to‐source voltage of 5

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Tubular 3D Resistive Random Access Memory Based on Rolled‐Up h‐BN Tube

2019-01-13T22:33:44+00:00January 13th, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

A tubular 3D‐resistive random access memory based on a rolled‐up hexagonal boron nitride (h‐BN) tube is demonstrated. Meaningfully, the tubular device exhibits forming‐free bipolar resistive switching behavior with desirable memory performance. Thus, this rolled‐up memory has great potential for increasing the data storage density, reducing the power consumption, and may be applied in the fields of sensing‐storage integration. Abstract Due to their advantages compared with planar structures, rolled‐up tubes have been applied in many fields, such as field‐effect transistors, compact capacitors, inductors, and integrative sensors. On the other hand, because of its perfect insulating nature, ultrahigh mechanical strength and atomic thickness property, 2D hexagonal boron nitride (h‐BN) is a very suitable material for rolled‐up memory applications. In this work, a tubular 3D resistive random access memory (RRAM) device based on rolled‐up h‐BN tube is realized, which is achieved by self‐rolled‐up technology. The tubular RRAM device exhibits bipolar resistive switching behavior, nonvolatile data storage ability, and satisfactorily low programming current compared with other 2D material‐based RRAM devices. Moreover, by releasing from the substrate, the footprint area of the tubular device is reduced by six times. This tubular RRAM device has great potential for increasing the data storage density, lowering the power consumption, and may be applied in the fields of rolled‐up systems and sensing‐storage integration.

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Dendritic Multipods: Sphere‐to‐Multipod Transmorphic Change of Nanoconfined Pt Electrocatalyst during Oxygen Reduction Reaction (Small 2/2019)

2019-01-13T22:33:34+00:00January 13th, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

Durability of catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) should be guaranteed for long‐term operation of fuel cells. In article number 1802228, Hu Young Jeong, Hyeon Suk Shin, Hyun‐Kon Song, and co‐workers design a catalyst/support system to confine platinum nanoparticles within holes of graphene for suppressing platinum agglomeration. Spherical multifaceted platinum particles are evolved to {110}‐dominant dendritic multipods within the nano‐dimensional space during repeated ORR processes.

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Dendritic Multipods: Sphere‐to‐Multipod Transmorphic Change of Nanoconfined Pt Electrocatalyst during Oxygen Reduction Reaction (Small 2/2019)

2019-01-12T10:34:29+00:00January 12th, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

Durability of catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) should be guaranteed for long‐term operation of fuel cells. In article number 1802228, Hu Young Jeong, Hyeon Suk Shin, Hyun‐Kon Song, and co‐workers design a catalyst/support system to confine platinum nanoparticles within holes of graphene for suppressing platinum agglomeration. Spherical multifaceted platinum particles are evolved to {110}‐dominant dendritic multipods within the nano‐dimensional space during repeated ORR processes.

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Tubular 3D Resistive Random Access Memory Based on Rolled‐Up h‐BN Tube

2019-01-10T10:40:03+00:00January 10th, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

A tubular 3D‐resistive random access memory based on a rolled‐up hexagonal boron nitride (h‐BN) tube is demonstrated. Meaningfully, the tubular device exhibits forming‐free bipolar resistive switching behavior with desirable memory performance. Thus, this rolled‐up memory has great potential for increasing the data storage density, reducing the power consumption, and may be applied in the fields of sensing‐storage integration. Abstract Due to their advantages compared with planar structures, rolled‐up tubes have been applied in many fields, such as field‐effect transistors, compact capacitors, inductors, and integrative sensors. On the other hand, because of its perfect insulating nature, ultrahigh mechanical strength and atomic thickness property, 2D hexagonal boron nitride (h‐BN) is a very suitable material for rolled‐up memory applications. In this work, a tubular 3D resistive random access memory (RRAM) device based on rolled‐up h‐BN tube is realized, which is achieved by self‐rolled‐up technology. The tubular RRAM device exhibits bipolar resistive switching behavior, nonvolatile data storage ability, and satisfactorily low programming current compared with other 2D material‐based RRAM devices. Moreover, by releasing from the substrate, the footprint area of the tubular device is reduced by six times. This tubular RRAM device has great potential for increasing the data storage density, lowering the power consumption, and may be applied in the fields of rolled‐up systems and sensing‐storage integration.

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Carbon Fiber Substrates: Synthesis of P‐Doped and NiCo‐Hybridized Graphene‐Based Fibers for Flexible Asymmetrical Solid‐State Micro‐Energy Storage Device (Small 1/2019)

2019-01-05T22:35:41+00:00January 5th, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: , , |

In article number 1803469, Dan Xiao and co‐workers develop an all‐solid‐state flexible asymmetric fiber‐supercapacitor with favorable flexibility and electrochemical properties based on P‐doped graphene oxide/carbon fiber and NiCo‐based graphene oxide/carbon fiber electrodes. According to the Chinese yin‐yang balance, the optimized matching of negative (yin) and positive (yang) electrodes provides the higher output for the supercapacitor based on a double reference‐electrode system.

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Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanohybrid–Assembled Microneedles as Mini‐Invasive Electrodes for Real‐Time Transdermal Biosensing

2019-01-05T22:35:39+00:00January 5th, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: , |

Transdermal H2O2 electrochemical biosensors based on microneedles (MNs) integrated with nanohybrid consisting of reduced graphene oxide and Pt nanoparticles (Pt/rGO) are developed. The polyvinylpyrrolidone‐protected Pt/rGO significantly improves the detection sensitivity of the MN electrode, while the MNs are utilized as a painless transdermal tool to access the in vivo environment. Abstract A variety of nanomaterial‐based biosensors have been developed to sensitively detect biomolecules in vitro, yet limited success has been achieved in real‐time sensing in vivo. The application of microneedles (MN) may offer a solution for painless and minimally‐invasive transdermal biosensing. However, integration of nanostructural materials on microneedle surface as transdermal electrodes remains challenging in applications. Here, a transdermal H2O2 electrochemical biosensor based on MNs integrated with nanohybrid consisting of reduced graphene oxide and Pt nanoparticles (Pt/rGO) is developed. The Pt/rGO significantly improves the detection sensitivity of the MN electrode, while the MNs are utilized as a painless transdermal tool to access the in vivo environment. The Pt/rGO nanostructures are protected by a water‐soluble polymer layer to avoid mechanical destruction during the MN skin insertion process. The polymer layer can readily be dissolved by the interstitial fluid and exposes the Pt/rGO on MNs for biosensing in vivo. The applications of the Pt/rGO‐integrated MNs for in situ and real‐time sensing of H2O2 in vivo are demonstrated both on pigskin and living mice. This work offers a unique real‐time transdermal biosensing system, which is a promising tool for sensing in vivo with high sensitivity but in a minimally‐invasive manner.

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Carbon Fiber Substrates: Synthesis of P‐Doped and NiCo‐Hybridized Graphene‐Based Fibers for Flexible Asymmetrical Solid‐State Micro‐Energy Storage Device (Small 1/2019)

2019-01-05T10:34:09+00:00January 5th, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: , , |

In article number 1803469, Dan Xiao and co‐workers develop an all‐solid‐state flexible asymmetric fiber‐supercapacitor with favorable flexibility and electrochemical properties based on P‐doped graphene oxide/carbon fiber and NiCo‐based graphene oxide/carbon fiber electrodes. According to the Chinese yin‐yang balance, the optimized matching of negative (yin) and positive (yang) electrodes provides the higher output for the supercapacitor based on a double reference‐electrode system.

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Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanohybrid–Assembled Microneedles as Mini‐Invasive Electrodes for Real‐Time Transdermal Biosensing

2019-01-04T16:33:20+00:00January 4th, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: , |

Transdermal H2O2 electrochemical biosensors based on microneedles (MNs) integrated with nanohybrid consisting of reduced graphene oxide and Pt nanoparticles (Pt/rGO) are developed. The polyvinylpyrrolidone‐protected Pt/rGO significantly improves the detection sensitivity of the MN electrode, while the MNs are utilized as a painless transdermal tool to access the in vivo environment. Abstract A variety of nanomaterial‐based biosensors have been developed to sensitively detect biomolecules in vitro, yet limited success has been achieved in real‐time sensing in vivo. The application of microneedles (MN) may offer a solution for painless and minimally‐invasive transdermal biosensing. However, integration of nanostructural materials on microneedle surface as transdermal electrodes remains challenging in applications. Here, a transdermal H2O2 electrochemical biosensor based on MNs integrated with nanohybrid consisting of reduced graphene oxide and Pt nanoparticles (Pt/rGO) is developed. The Pt/rGO significantly improves the detection sensitivity of the MN electrode, while the MNs are utilized as a painless transdermal tool to access the in vivo environment. The Pt/rGO nanostructures are protected by a water‐soluble polymer layer to avoid mechanical destruction during the MN skin insertion process. The polymer layer can readily be dissolved by the interstitial fluid and exposes the Pt/rGO on MNs for biosensing in vivo. The applications of the Pt/rGO‐integrated MNs for in situ and real‐time sensing of H2O2 in vivo are demonstrated both on pigskin and living mice. This work offers a unique real‐time transdermal biosensing system, which is a promising tool for sensing in vivo with high sensitivity but in a minimally‐invasive manner.

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Recent Advances in Stretchable Supercapacitors Enabled by Low‐Dimensional Nanomaterials

2019-01-02T08:34:44+00:00January 2nd, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: , |

Recent advances in the development of stretchable supercapacitors from low‐dimensional nanomaterials are reviewed, with an emphasis on the aspects of electrode materials, design strategies, and fabrication and performance of devices. The challenges and prospective of the stretchable supercapacitors are also discussed, providing fundamental insight and offering useful guidelines for future design of new high‐performance stretchable energy devices for wearable and medical applications. Abstract Supercapacitors (SCs) have shown great potential for mobile energy storage technology owing to their long‐term durability, electrochemical stability, structural simplicity, as well as exceptional power density without much compromise in the energy density and cycle life parameters. As a result, stretchable SC devices have been incorporated in a variety of emerging electronics applications ranging from wearable electronic textiles to microrobots to integrated energy systems. In this review, the recent progress and achievements in the field of stretchable SCs enabled by low‐dimensional nanomaterials such as polypyrrole, carbon nanotubes, and graphene are presented. First, the three major categories of stretchable supercapacitors are discussed: double‐layer supercapacitors, pseudo‐supercapacitors, and hybrid supercapacitors. Then, the representative progress in developing stretchable electrodes with low‐dimensional (0D, 1D, and 2D) nanomaterials is described. Next, the design strategies enabling the stretchability of the devices, including the wavy‐shape design, wire‐shape design, textile‐shape design, kirigami‐shape design, origami‐shape design, and serpentine bridge‐island design are emphasized, with the aim of improving the electrochemical performance under the complex stretchability conditions that may be encountered in practical applications. Finally, the newest developments, major challenges, and outlook in the field of stretchable SC development

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Bioinspired Photonic Barcodes: Bioinspired Photonic Barcodes with Graphene Oxide Encapsulation for Multiplexed MicroRNA Quantification (Small 52/2018)

2019-01-02T08:34:36+00:00January 2nd, 2019|Categories: Publications|Tags: , |

In article number 1803551, Zhiyang Li, Xuehao Wang, Yuanjin Zhao, and co‐workers present mussel‐inspired photonic crystal (PhC) barcodes with graphene oxide (GO) encapsulation for multiplex miRNA detection. The GO‐based hybridization chain reaction strategy realizes low abundance and high sensitivity miRNA quantification. At the same time, multiplex detection is achieved by employing different GO‐decorated PhC barcodes with high accuracy and reproducibility.

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Electrochemical Energy Storage: Mesoporous Reduced Graphene Oxide as a High Capacity Cathode for Aluminum Batteries (Small 51/2018)

2018-12-30T00:34:24+00:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Publications|Tags: , , |

Tailoring the pore size distribution of carbon‐based cathodes is a decisive factor for the electrochemical performance of aluminum batteries. In article number 1803584, Pedro M. F. J. Costa and co‐workers show how the mesopores in a reduced graphene oxide powder facilitate the movement of large chloroaluminate ions, effectively minimizing the inactive mass content of the electrode and compensating for an ordinary micropore volume.

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Blue Phosphorene: Epitaxial Synthesis of Blue Phosphorene (Small 51/2018)

2018-12-30T00:34:22+00:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

In article number 1804066, Hamid Oughaddou and co‐workers synthesize a single‐layer of blue phosphorene on Au(111) using molecular beam epitaxy. Scanning tunneling microscopy images show high‐quality and ordered monolayer phosphorene. Density functional theory calculations support a blue phosphorene layer presenting two different structures while photoemission (ARPES) measurements reveal a band gap of at least 0.8 eV.

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Interfacial Field‐Effect Transistors: An Elastic Interfacial Transistor Enabled by Superhydrophobicity (Small 51/2018)

2018-12-30T00:34:21+00:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

In article number 1804006, Chih‐Jen Shih and co‐workers introduce a new transistor design concept for sensing ultrasmall surface forces by the deformation of a liquid metal droplet on the superhydrophobic semiconductor nanowires grown on graphene, referring to the interfacial field‐effect transistors.

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Mesoporous Reduced Graphene Oxide as a High Capacity Cathode for Aluminum Batteries

2018-12-30T00:34:18+00:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Publications|Tags: , , |

Tailoring the pore size distribution of carbon‐based cathodes is a decisive factor for the electrochemical performance of aluminum batteries. Here, the mesopores in a reduced graphene oxide powder facilitate the movement of large chloroaluminate ions, effectively minimizing the inactive mass content of the electrode and compensating for an ordinary micropore volume. Abstract Research in the field of aluminum batteries has focused heavily on electrodes made of carbonaceous materials. Still, the capacities reported for these multivalent systems remain stubbornly low. It is believed that a high structural quality of graphitic carbons and/or specific surface areas of >1000 m2 g‐1 are key factors to obtain optimal performance and cycling stability. Here an aluminum chloride battery is presented in which reduced graphene oxide (RGO) powder, dried under supercritical conditions, is used as the active cathode material and niobium foil as the current collector. With a specific surface area of just 364 m2 g‐1, the RGO enables a gravimetric capacity of 171 mAh g‐1 at 100 mA g‐1 and remarkable stability over a wide range of current densities (<15% decrease over 100 cycles in the interval 100–20000 mA g‐1). These properties, up to now achieved only with much larger surface area materials, result from the cathode’s tailored mesoporosity. The 20 nm wide mesopores facilitate the movement of the chloroaluminate ions through the RGO, effectively minimizing the inactive mass content of the electrode. This more than compensates for the ordinary micropore volume of the graphene powder.

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Hybrid Architectures based on 2D MXenes and Low‐Dimensional Inorganic Nanostructures: Methods, Synergies, and Energy‐Related Applications

2018-12-30T00:34:16+00:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Publications|Tags: , |

Hybridizing 2D MXenes and low‐dimensional inorganic nanostructures in elaborately designed architectures is of utmost significance, and provides a chance to integrate their unique properties in a complementary way. This review highlights recent progress in this regime, putting emphasis on the methods, structural and functional synergies, and energy‐related applications. Moreover, the present challenges and the future development directions are also discussed. Abstract Being conductive and flexible, MXenes, including transition metal carbides and nitrides, are expected to compete with, or even outperform graphene as 2D substrates serving in versatile applications. On the other hand, the extraordinary electrochemical activities of MXenes make them promising candidates as electrode materials in rechargeable batteries and supercapacitors, or as electrocatalysts in water splitting. However, MXenes are inclined to self‐restack due to hydrogen bonding or van der Waals interactions, which may lead to substantial loss of electroactive area as well as inaccessibility of ions and electrolytes. In this sense, hybridizing 2D MXenes and low‐dimensional inorganic nanostructures in elaborately designed architectures is of utmost significance, and provides a chance to integrate their unique properties in a complementary way. As such, this review is dedicated to highlighting recent progress in this regime, putting emphasis on the methods, structural and functional synergies, and energy‐related applications. Moreover, the present challenges and the future development directions are also discussed in depth.

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Epitaxial Synthesis of Blue Phosphorene

2018-12-30T00:34:14+00:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

Phosphorene is a 2D material with an intrinsic tunable bandgap and high carrier mobility. Epitaxial growth of single‐layer phosphorene on Au(111) is achieved using molecular beam epitaxy. Scanning tunneling microscope images show high‐quality and ordered monolayer phosphorene. Density functional theory calculations support a blue phosphorene layer presenting two different structures. Photoemission (ARPES) measurements reveal a bandgap of at least 0.8 eV. Abstract Phosphorene is a new 2D material composed of a single or few atomic layers of black phosphorus. Phosphorene has both an intrinsic tunable direct bandgap and high carrier mobility values, which make it suitable for a large variety of optical and electronic devices. However, the synthesis of single‐layer phosphorene is a major challenge. The standard procedure to obtain phosphorene is by exfoliation. More recently, the epitaxial growth of single‐layer phosphorene on Au(111) was investigated by molecular beam epitaxy and the obtained structure described as a blue phosphorene sheet. In the present study, large areas of high‐quality monolayer phosphorene, with a bandgap value equal to at least 0.8 eV, are synthesized on Au(111). The experimental investigations, coupled with density functional theory calculations, give evidence of two distinct phases of blue phosphorene on Au(111), instead of one as previously reported, and their atomic structures are determined.

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2D Crystals in Three Dimensions: Electronic Decoupling of Single‐Layered Platelets in Colloidal Nanoparticles

2018-12-30T00:34:12+00:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Publications|Tags: , |

Optoelectronic properties of 2D crystals are distinct from their bulk counterparts, and advantageous for applications. Band gaps are larger, and sometimes direct, well‐suited for optoelectronic and photocatalytic applications. However, being atomically thin, low density is a bottleneck for quantitative performance. The proposed intercalation of layered materials with short surfactants yields electronically decoupled layers with similar properties as monolayers, but higher cross‐sections. Abstract 2D crystals, single sheets of layered materials, often show distinct properties desired for optoelectronic applications, such as larger and direct band gaps, valley‐ and spin‐orbit effects. Being atomically thin, the low amount of material is a bottleneck in photophysical and photochemical applications. Here, the formation of stacks of 2D crystals intercalated with small surfactant molecules is proposed. It is shown, using first principles calculations, that the very short surfactant methyl amine electronically decouples the layers. The indirect–direct band gap transition characteristic for Group 6 transition metal dichalcogenides is demonstrated experimentally by observing the emergence of a strong photoluminescence signal for ethoxide‐intercalated WSe2 and MoSe2 multilayered nanoparticles with lateral size of about 10 nm and beyond. The proposed hybrid materials offer the highest possible density of the 2D crystals with electronic properties typical of monolayers. Variation of the surfactant’s chemical potential allows fine‐tuning of electronic properties and potentially elimination of trap states caused by defects.

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An Elastic Interfacial Transistor Enabled by Superhydrophobicity

2018-12-30T00:34:09+00:00December 29th, 2018|Categories: Publications|Tags: |

A new force‐sensing concept of interfacial field‐effect transistor (IFET) is proposed. Ultrasensitive stress sensing is enabled by deformation of liquid metal droplets on hydrophobic semiconductor nanowires, with the current density further modulated by a field effect at the semiconductor–graphene interface. This study demonstrates a versatile platform that bridges multiple macroscopic interfacial phenomena with nanoelectronic responses. Abstract Enabling mechanical responsiveness in field‐effect transistors (FETs) offers new technological opportunity beyond the reach of existing platforms. Here a new force‐sensing concept is proposed by controlling the wettability of a semiconductor surface, referring to the interfacial field‐effect transistors (IFETs). An IFET made by superhydrophobic semiconductor nanowires (NWs) sandwiched between a layer of 2D electron gas (2DEG) and a conductive Cassie–Baxter (CB) sessile droplet is designed. Following the hydrostatic deformation of the CB droplet upon mechanical stress, an extremely small elastic modulus of 820 pascals vertical to the substrate plane, or ≈100 times softer than Ecoflex rubbers, enabling an excellent stress detection limit down to <10 pascals and a stress sensitivity of 36 kPa−1 is proposed. The IFET exhibits an on/off current ratio exceeding 3 × 104, as the carrier density profile at the NW/2DEG interface is modulated by a partially penetrated electrostatic field. This study demonstrates a versatile platform that bridges multiple macroscopic interfacial phenomena with nanoelectronic responses.

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